Vet Visit

We planned on heading out to Granbury this morning but due to a new “growth” on our beagle’s belly, we’re postponing for one extra day.  However, when we leave still kind of depends on what we learn at the vet.  Lucy Lou, our 12-year-old AKC registered beagle, has developed a handful of small lumps on her body.  We’ve counted 4 now, but one of them we noticed had turned red and proceeded to double in size over a couple of days.  It seems to have slowed its growth but we still need to check it out.  We first noticed this one while in Canadian for Christmas a few days ago.

We’re hoping for the best.  At this point, we all realize that she’s a pretty old dog but until now, we’ve always thought of her as the more healthy and more spry of our two dogs.  Cramer, who is also 12, has steadily lost more and more of his vision over the last year.  It was discovered in 2009 that his tear-ducts were no longer working as they should.  Dry eye is not uncommon among old Dachshunds, but his case was deteriorated to where he’s lost almost all sight.  He navigates our house quite well, but you really notice his difficulty when we visit other places, like last week in Canadian.

Lucy Lou:

DSCF6046

Cramer:

DSCF6051

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That Face

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I thought I’d bring a little humor to the blog this evening. Those of you that know our family know that Zachary is a big source of humor.

One thing about Zachary is that he does not hide his emotions. He displays them clearly on his face. One that I don’t think he intended to be funny is his "mad" face, though it has turned in to quite a game to try to imitate it. He’ll do anything for a laugh, so it doesn’t bother him that we’ve made a joke out of it (something that would disturb his brother A LOT).

What about you? Can you make Zachary’s "mad" face?

And, just cause it made me laugh, here’s the face he made when I asked him to make his mad face so I could take a picture. 🙂

20101228-083548

She’s got the Cancer (probably)

(Cross-posted on Scott’s personal blog, “What Color is Tuesday?”)

sad-face-yellowIt’s pretty sad, but most likely our little beagle has a cancerous tumor on her belly.  While we won’t know for sure unless we send off a biopsy to a pathology lab, the vet said it is most likely a squamous cell carcinoma or a hemangiosarcoma.  In both cases, the best treatment is surgical removal of the tumor.  Since she also has pretty severe tooth decay, the vet recommends that we put Lucy completely under anesthesia, give her IV fluids and do both her teeth cleaning and tumor removal.  Another option would be to just locally anesthetize the area and remove the tumor.

I hate having to make the call on a pet.  After all, she’s a member of the family but she is just an animal.  I’ve always said that owners that spends thousands of dollars on treatments like chemotherapy or radiation are a little bit loony, but it’s harder to say that when your own pet is nearing the end.  We know that Lucy has lived a long life and she’s right at the average lifespan for her breed.  And yet, she’s still eating, drinking, playing and being … well, … being Lucy.

So, what do you say?  How far do you go for the family pet?  Can you put a price tag on the companionship from your puppies? $75, $350, or thousands of $$$?

Vet Visit

(cross-posted on Scott’s personal blog at “What Color is Tuesday?”)

We planned on heading out to Granbury this morning but due to a new “growth” on our beagle’s belly, we’re postponing for one extra day.  However, when we leave still kind of depends on what we learn at the vet.  Lucy Lou, our 12-year-old AKC registered beagle, has developed a handful of small lumps on her body.  We’ve counted 4 now, but one of them we noticed had turned red and proceeded to double in size over a couple of days.  It seems to have slowed its growth but we still need to check it out.  We first noticed this one while in Canadian for Christmas a few days ago.

We’re hoping for the best.  At this point, we all realize that she’s a pretty old dog but until now, we’ve always thought of her as the more healthy and more spry of our two dogs.  Cramer, who is also 12, has steadily lost more and more of his vision over the last year.  It was discovered in 2009 that his tear-ducts were no longer working as they should.  Dry eye is not uncommon among old Dachshunds, but his case was deteriorated to where he’s lost almost all sight.  He navigates our house quite well, but you really notice his difficulty when we visit other places, like last week in Canadian.

Lucy Lou:

DSCF6046

Cramer:

DSCF6051

O Christmas Trees

Since Emily’s first Christmas, we’ve been carrying on a tradition in our family in which we purchase one new Christmas ornament for each of our kids each year.  I’ve certainly lost track of who got what and when, but thankfully we’ve labeled each ornament and kept them in good shape over the years.  However, the ultimate result of this tradition is a very sentimental but horrendously hodge podge Christmas tree.

This year we tried something new.  We bought a separate 3’ tree for each kid.  They’ve now accumulated enough ornaments of their own plus a few oldies-but-goodies from Christmas-past and they can decorate their own trees.  Plus, with the dormers on our second floor, where the boys have their room, we can put them in windows and add to our external illumination.

2010_Christmaslights

(See them up on the second floor)

The final benefit and probably the main goal was that we were able to decorate our tree with a more uniform style.

ChristmasTree

Here are the kiddos trees:

zachsTree TimsTree EmsTree
Zach’s Tree Tim’s Tree Emily’s Tree
(with a photo bomb by Zach)

How did I get into this mess?

I’m not entirely sure how it happened but I’ve found myself chairing two different University committees at Wayland as well as chairing the Budget Study Committee at First Baptist Church.  Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m all for committees.  I’m perfectly happy to serve on one, maybe two, without much complaining at all.  But all this is really starting to wear me down.

I’d prefer not to complain too much, especially in a forum where many folks could come and read. However, I’ve got to say it out loud to remind myself that there is such a thing as “too many irons in the fire”. 

Being raised in a small town, going to school in a small district, I was able to get away with doing just about every activity available in the school plus a few things in the community and church.  I remember being told by numerous people that I could choose to be mediocre at a lot of things or great at a few things.  I didn’t accept that and I made every attempt to do everything, from band to golf to academics to UIL competitions in math, speech, debate, science, journalism, etc.  You name it, I’m pretty sure I tried it.  (Ok, there was no ag or 4-H, but I didn’t own any boots or country music, so I get a pass on that one).

That philosophy set a precedent that has finally started to plague me as an adult.  The mindset that developed tells me that if I see a project that either I’m interested in or someone asks me to participate in or lead, I only ask one question, “Am I able to do it?”  If I can envision the work and mentally develop a strategy to accomplish the goals, I tend to say yes.

People tell me I need to learn to say no.  Truth is, I say no plenty of times, but I say no when I believe I’m not the right person for the job.  That is to say, I’m not capable to doing the job as it should be done.

In addition to weighing my capabilities as a function of only my strengths, I need to weigh them as also a function of my time and priorities.  I’m notoriously bad at estimating the amount of time needed to accomplish my tasks, but I am also notoriously consistent.  I always estimate a much shorter time than is actually needed.

Fortunately for me, one of the committees is nearing the completion of its duties. And while, all of this may sound like I’m really down on myself, things are actually looking up.  Three days ago, I didn’t know what was causing the severe funk I was in.  Being able to identify it and focus in on my real priorities, I’m able to relax into the loving arms of an all-knowing, all-loving God whose plans for me never fail.

No test or temptation that comes your way is beyond the course of what others have had to face. All you need to remember is that God will never let you down; he’ll never let you be pushed past your limit; he’ll always be there to help you come through it.   I Corinthians 10:30 (THE MESSAGE)

 

Pinewood Derby Races

This past Saturday was the annual Royal Ambassador’s (RA) Pinewood Derby races in Lubbock.  Timothy competed with the car he worked on with his Grandaddy.  Last year, with minimal effort we managed to win 1 race and lose the next two.  Thanks to the ingenuity of Lori’s Dad and Timothy’s well executed racing style, we won 5 in row putting us into the sweet sixteen and then the final four.  Though they didn’t award a 4th place, we’ve decided that’s where we must have finished.

The rest of the FBC Plainview team performed very well with a couple from our church finishing 2nd and 3rd in the Lad’s division and another one finishing second in the Crusader’s.  I also learned that there is an adult division, so I may have to let Joel build his own and I’ll race it for him. Winking smile

Here’s a few pics from Saturday.  Way to go, Timo!